On April 12 the International Law Institute hosted a conference and discussion on the release of Ambassador John Maresca's [Ret.] new book "The Unknown Peace Agreement: How the Helsinki–Geneva–Vienna–Paris Negotiations of the CSCE Produced the Final Peace Agreement to formally concluded World War Two in Europe".

The agreements setting the foundations of relations between Post Soviet Russia and the Western nations, is as critical and sensitive today, as it was 30 years ago.

The agreement, formally known as the Joint Declaration of Twenty Two States, signed by their heads of state or government, including George H W Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev on November 19, 1990 in Paris, this "peace treaty" ended World War II. The chief US negotiator of this agreement and many others, Ambassador Maresca has had a most distinguished career, twice Chef du Cabinet to NATO Secretaries General, and rector of the UN University for Peace, possibly most noteworthy was his appointment in early 1991 by Secretary James Baker as special envoy to open US relations with the newly independent states of the former USSR. He was the first American official to visit these countries, including Ukraine. His assistant throughout this mission was Marie Yovanovich, later US ambassador to Ukraine.

Ambassador presented his book and the "Baker mission". He was introduced by his former colleague Avis Bohlen, former assistant secretary of state and American ambassador to Bulgaria, and daughter of Charles Bohlen, who was once Jack Maresca's boss in the Department.



 

 

 




THE PUBLICATION:


TITLE:                THE UNKNOWN PEACE AGREEMENT

                          How the Helsinki–Geneva–Vienna–Paris Negotiations of the CSCE Produced the Final Peace Agreement
                          and Concluded World War Two in Europe


AUTHOR:            John J. Maresca


PURCHASE:      https://cup.columbia.edu/book/the-unknown-peace-agreement/9783838216324


John Maresca The Unknown Peace 

DESCRIPTION:

The “Joint Declaration of Twenty-two States,” signed in Paris on November 19, 1990 by the Chiefs of State or Government of all the countries which participated in World War Two in Europe, is the closest document we will ever have to a true “peace treaty” concluding World War II in Europe. In his new book, retired United States Ambassador John Maresca, who led the American participation in the negotiations, explains how this document was quietly negotiated following the reunification of Germany and in view of Soviet interest at that time in normalizing their relations with Europe. With the reunification of Germany which had just taken place it was, for the first time since the end of the war, possible to have a formal agreement that the war was over, and the countries concerned were already negotiating in Vienna in preparation for a summit-level signing ceremony in Paris. With Gorbachev interested in more positive relations with Europe, and with the formal reunification of Germany which had just taken place, such an agreement was — for the first time — possible. All the leaders coming to the Paris summit had an interest in producing a document which would formally conclude the War — a “peace agreement” -- and which would be signed at the summit level by the Chiefs of State or Government of the states which were participants in the war. This gave impetus for the negotiators in Vienna to draft such a document, intended to normalize relations among them. The "Joint Declaration" was negotiated carefully, and privately, among the Ambassadors representing the countries which had participated, in one way or another, in World War Two in Europe. And the resulting document—the “Joint Declaration” — was signed at the summit level, at the Elysée Palace in Paris, on November 19, 1990. But this “Joint Declaration" was overshadowed at the time by the "Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe" — signed at the same signing ceremony — and has remained un-noticed since then.


AUTHOR:

The “Joint Declaration of Twenty-two States,” signed in Paris on November 19, 1990 by the Chiefs of State or Government of all the countries which participated in World War Two in Europe, is the closest document we will ever have to a true “peace treaty” concluding World War II in Europe. In his new book, retired United States Ambassador John Maresca, who led the American participation in the negotiations, explains how this document was quietly negotiated following the reunification of Germany and in view of Soviet interest in normalizing their relations with Europe. With the reunification of Germany which had just taken place it was, for the first time since the end of the war, possible to have a formal agreement that the war was over, and the countries concerned were all gathering for a summit-level signing ceremony in Paris. With Gorbachev interested in more positive relations with Europe, and with the formal reunification of Germany, such an agreement was — for the first time — possible, because for the first time since the War it was possible to negotiate and agree with Germany as the single, sovereign state which had conducted the war. All the leaders coming to the Paris summit had an interest in a formal conclusion to the War, and this gave impetus for the negotiators in Vienna to draft a document intended to normalize relations among them. The Joint Declaration was negotiated carefully, and privately, among the Ambassadors representing the countries which had participated, in one way or another, in World War Two in Europe. The resulting document — the “Joint Declaration” — was signed, at the summit level, at the Elysée Palace in Paris. But there was no public announcement of the Joint Declaration and its significance, and it was overshadowed by the "Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe" — signed at the same signature event — and has remained un-noticed since then.

No one could possibly have foreseen that the USSR would be dissolved about one year later, making it impossible to negotiate a more formal treaty to close World War II in Europe. The “Joint Declaration” thus remains the closest document the world will ever see to a formal “Peace Treaty” concluding World War Two in Europe. It was signed by all the Chiefs of State or Government of all the countries which participated in World War II in Europe.

Ambassador John J. (“Jack”) Maresca spent a career as an American diplomat and negotiator, after six years as a US Naval Officer. He was the “Chef de Cabinet” for two NATO Secretaries General, and was involved in the CSCE negotiations from the time when NATO was preparing for them in Brussels. He went to Helsinki for the opening round of the CSCE, pursued the negotiations through the first CSCE conference, which was concluded at the summit level in Helsinki, and became the Deputy Head of the United States Delegation. He was then in charge of the State Department office which tracked the follow-up to the Conference and was later named as the Ambassador and Chief of the American delegation when the Conference was reconvened in Vienna to prepare for the second CSCE summit in Paris. He was then designated as a special Ambassadorial envoy to open US relations with the newly independent states, after the dissolution of the former USSR, and was the first official American visitor to these countries after their independence.