covid header
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
team management
 
 
medical procurement
 
 
emergency procurement
Also avalable: International Public Procurement Seminar
 
 
 
 
COVID-19 WEBINAR SERIES - HOW LEGISLATURES AND THE EXECUTIVE CAN WORK TOGETHER THROUGH A CRISIS - ENABLE DISPLAY/LOAD IMAGES TO VIEW THE WEBINAR PICTURE
Also avalable: Legislative Strategic Management Seminar
COVID-19 WEBINAR SERIES - MANAGING A TEAM DURING A CRISIS - ENABLE DISPLAY/LOAD IMAGES TO VIEW THE WEBINAR PICTURE
Also avalable: Leadership & Management in International Development Seminar
COVID-19 WEBINAR SERIES - EMERGENCY PROCUREMENT AND THE FEDERAL RESPONSE - ENABLE DISPALY/LOAD IMAGES TO VIEW THE WEBINAR PICTURE
Also avalable: Procurement for Policy Makers Seminar
COVID-19 WEBINAR SERIES - EMERGENCY PROCUREMENT AND THE FEDERAL RESPONSE - ENABLE DISPALY/LOAD IMAGES TO VIEW THE WEBINAR PICTURE

 

 

DATES: SEP 21 - OCT 2, 2020    
         
VENUE: ILI Headquarters, Washington, D.C., USA      
       
TUITION: $4200    
       

 

 

 

 

 

Overview

Disasters and emergencies are inevitable and their impacts are often severe, and pose many challenges. This is so whether these originate from natural causes, or are caused by humankind, or occur as a combination of both. Causes include infectious diseases, earthquakes, floods, terrorism, and increasingly the many threats posed by climate change. Important questions arise in respect to developing suitable strategies for managing risks; and also in respect to preventing, mitigating, and responding to these crises.

This seminar will assess key aspects from within an interagency and interdisciplinary perspective, including applicable legal frameworks; developing sector strategies; economic and social dislocations, as well as exploring key concepts such as crisis communication; emergency procurement; managing supply chains; anti-corruption measures and the important role of leadership, whilst focusing on implementing response policies.

Particular attention will be paid to the challenges faced by emerging or transitional economies. As has been noted in the literature, the impact of disasters and emergencies on development is apparent and the importance of disaster risk management is growing. However, developing countries often struggle to effectively integrate strategic approaches with national policy, and also with effective implementation practices. It is often the poor populations in disaster areas that are hardest hit by losses and setbacks.

This seminar is designed specifically for the benefit of those actors in the public and private sectors and NGOs who are engaged in disaster and emergency management programming and implementation, as well as government officials in related ministries (finance, agriculture, environment, health, etc.) whose areas of responsibilities may intersect with, or be impacted by, disaster and emergency management policies, programming and/or implementation aspects. Case studies will be introduced throughout the seminar.

  

Course Outline

 

ELEMENTS OF DISASTER AND EMERGENCY RISK MANAGEMENT

Legal frameworks

  • Key aspects of international legal framework/s (including treaties) for an effective and humane approach to disaster and emergency management
  • National disaster and emergency management legal frameworks

 

NATIONAL SECTOR PLANNING AND STAKEHOLDERS

Developing an effective national sector plan

  • Responsibilities and supervision
  • Participation and consultation with national and local stakeholders, including civil society; the private sector; and more
  • Considerations for institution building and reform


Role of the public sector and governmental policies

  • Enabling a cooperative interagency environment
  • Public sector budgets and fiscal capacity
  • Coordinated policies in land use, energy, water and other natural resources, irrigation, food safety and consumer protection, education, employment, trade, investment and competition, subsidies, price supports and other market interventions, infrastructure development, taxation and others
  • Food supply, emergency preparedness and disaster relief


Role of the private sector

  • Supply chains
  • Access to technology and to research and development
  • Access to funds and financial technology
  • Enhanced employment
  • Education and training
  • Management expertise


Role of Civil Society

  • Social, civic and educational non-governmental organizations
  • Labor organizations
  • Universities, non profits, NGOs
  • Religious, fraternal, civic and charitable organizations
  • Women's, ethnic and minority group organizations


Role of International Institutions and Regional Organizations

  • World Bank, United Nations, UN Food and Agriculture among others
  • Types of funds and programs
  • Access to funds and programs; management and accountability, coordination with other programs


National economic and political environment

  • National fiscal and financial considerations and macroeconomic environment- price supports, subsidies and other governmental interventions
  • Involvement of international and regional organizations
  • Markets and products, existing and potential
  • State of literacy and education


Social Safety Nets and Emergency Preparedness

  • Emergency preparedness, planning and disaster relief
  • Social safety nets

 

IMPLEMENTING BEST PRACTICES FOR DISASTER AND EMERGENCY RISK MANAGEMENT (SELECTED TOPICS)

  • Risk assessment and threat modeling
  • Leadership in times of crises
  • Crisis communications & decision-making
  • Emergency procurement and managing supply chains
  • Anti-corruption measures
  • Program and project development (including approaches to monitoring and evaluation)
  • Conflict resolution
  • Capacity building for all stakeholders
  • Other implementation response policies

 

 

 

DATES: DEC 6-10, 2021    
         
VENUE: ILI Headquarters, Washington, D.C., USA      
       
TUITION: $2245    
       

 

 

 

 

 

Overview

Customs authorities play a vital role with respect to international trade in goods. As the “gatekeepers”, they are charged with determining how much duty to assess on imports, as well as enforcing statutory restrictions on the import of specific goods. The course will discuss the way in which customs authorities carry out their duties, and the international agreements that govern their operations. The course will focus on the Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA), adopted by the WTO in 2013 and entered into force in 2017. The TFA requires each Member to implement 37 specific obligations, all designed to streamline the international movement of goods. The TFA developed countries already comply with all or most of the obligations, so that the burden of implementation will fall most heavily on developing countries. However, the TFA is the first WTO Agreement to allow Members to set their own timetables for implementation and to condition implementation of specific obligations on the receipt of adequate technical assistance.

The course is designed as a practical course that will assist trade officials in their work and provide hands-on advice on implementation of the TFA, as well as to deal with its challenges. It will be taught by present and former senior government officials, leading academics and practitioners, and officials from multinational organizations.

The course will also spend time on the negotiation of trade agreements. It will discuss the need for careful preparation, including detailed interaction with the stakeholders, and techniques for achieving the best possible outcome. It will include a simulated negotiation.


Course Outline

Functions of Customs Authorities

  • Duty Assesment

    • Classification
    • Valuation
    • Rules of Origin
  • Import Licensing
  • Other

The Trade Facilitation Agreement

  • Background and rationale
  • Overview of the Agreement
  • Current US Trade Policy
  • Implementation – categorization of requirements
  • Key issues:

    • Transparency
    • Advance rulings
    • Review procedures
    • Release of goods
    • Border agency cooperation
    • Formalities, including Single Window
    • Freedom of transit
    • Customs cooperation
    • Shipping/Logistics
    • Transport security
    • IT and e-commerce

Course Advisor

Patrick Macrory is Director of ILI's International Trade Law Center. He was a senior partner in two of Washington's largest law firms, and has practiced trade law for more than forty years. He has taught international trade law at universities in Washington, London, and Tokyo. He has written extensively on the subject, and was Editor-in-Chief of a major multi-volume work on the WTO published in 2005. He is also co-editor of “A Business Guide to Trade and Investment”, published in 2017/18 by the International Chamber of Commerce.

NOTE: This course can be taken on its own or in conjunction with the course on Multilateral and Regional Trade Agreements, to be held the previous week.

 

 

DATES: NOV 29 - DEC 10, 2021    
         
VENUE: ILI Headquarters, Washington, D.C., USA      
       
TUITION: $4200    
       

 

 

 

 

 

COURSE LINKS: 

MULTILATERAL AND REGIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS

THE TRADE FACILITATION AGREEMENT & OTHER IMPORTANT CUSTOMS ISSUES; NEGOTIATION OF TRADE AGREEMENTS

 

Overview

This seminar offers an exciting opportunity for personal and professional development, and consists of a combination of two courses: Multilateral and Regional Trade Agreements; and The Trade Facilitation Agreement & Other Important Customs Issues. Participants in this course will receive two certificates indicating completion of each seminar. To see descriptions of the topical areas covered, please refer to the two descriptions above or in the ILI Brochure. In addition, the participants who enroll in this two week combination seminar will have more opportunities to network and can take part in the optional weekend sightseeing tour of Washington offered to participants who attend seminars lasting two weeks or longer at the ILI.

 

Course Advisor

Patrick Macrory is Director of ILI's International Trade Law Center. He was a senior partner in two of Washington's largest law firms, and has practiced trade law for more than forty years. He has taught international trade law at universities in Washington, London, and Tokyo. He has written extensively on the subject, and was Editor-in-Chief of a major multi-volume work on the WTO published in 2005. He is also co-editor of “A Business Guide to Trade and Investment”, published in 2017/18 by the International Chamber of Commerce.

 

 

DATES: NOV 29 - DEC 3, 2021    
         
VENUE: ILI Headquarters, Washington, D.C., USA      
       
TUITION: $2245    
       

 

 

 

 

 

Overview

The seminar will cover the basic GATT and WTO rules, and examine the implications of the massive growth of Regional Trade Agreements. The course is designed to help governments and enterprises to take full advantage of the opportunities provided by multilateral and regional trade agreements, as well as to deal with their challenges. It will be taught by present and former senior government officials, leading academics and practitioners, and officials from multinational organizations.

The creation of the WTO some twenty years ago, with its effective enforcement system, vastly expanded the scope and effectiveness of the international trade system. While the Doha Round of multilateral trade negotiations has largely failed, the WTO still plays a vital role in the trading system, which is underpinned by the rules developed by the GATT (the WTO’s predecessor) and the WTO itself. Most importantly, these rules are enforced by the WTO dispute settlement system, which is much more effective than most international D/S systems. More than 500 cases have been filed with the WTO, compared with only three state-to-state cases under the NAFTA.

In part because of the failure of the Doha Round to produce much in the way of lowered trade barriers, Regional Trade Agreements (RTAs) have become an increasingly important part of the international trading system. RTAs already cover more than half of world trade, and massive new agreements are under negotiation. Although the United States has pulled out of the Trans Pacific Partnership, the other eleven signatories are moving ahead. China is leading negotiations of the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP) (16 countries, including India, China, Japan and Korea, accounting for nearly 30 percent of world trade). The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) between the United States and the EU, accounting for about 40 percent of world trade, is another possibility. There is also a great deal of RTA activity in Africa, as the many existing RTAs are consolidated with a view to eventually creating a single African Economic Union.

The course will also examine President Trump’s impact on the world trading system. The WTO dispute settlement system has been under attack by the United States, and the President’s approach to dealing with perceived trade problems have been unorthodox, to say the least.


Course Outline


Background: the International Trading System

  • Creation and operation of the WTO
  • WTO rules governing trade in goods, services and intellectual property
  • WTO dispute settlement

Regional Trade Agreements

  • GATT and GATS provisions authorizing RTAs
  • The pros and cons of RTAs
  • The growth of “Megaregionals”
  • Dispute settlement in RTAs
  • Particular issues:

    • Trade in goods – rules of origin
    • Trade in services
    • Intellectual property
    • Investment
    • Non-traditional issues – environment, labor, digital trade, etc.

Course Advisor

Patrick Macrory is Director of ILI's International Trade Law Center. He was a senior partner in two of Washington's largest law firms, and has practiced trade law for more than forty years. He has taught international trade law at universities in Washington, London, and Tokyo. He has written extensively on the subject, and was Editor-in-Chief of a major multi-volume work on the WTO published in 2005. He is also co-editor of “A Business Guide to Trade and Investment”, published in 2017/18 by the International Chamber of Commerce.

NOTE: This course can be taken on its own or in conjunction with the course on The Trade Facilitation Agreement and Other Important Customs Issues, Negotiation of Trade Agreements, to be held the following week.