DATES: OCT 22 - NOV 2, 2018    
       
TUITION: $3950    
       

 

 

 

Overview

Countries face many challenges related to sustainable development of their energy sectors. Governments must adapt policies and legal framework to efficiently develop their natural resources (both conventional and renewable resources); diversify and optimize the energy source mix, address climate change impact and meet INDC requirements, attract capital and expertise to develop the entire energy sector value chain; capture economic rents to pass through energy sector benefits to local communities; ensure optimum local content development; improve linkages to power sector; foster transparency, corporate social responsibility and environmental stewardship - all of which is critical for securing the affordable, reliable, and sustainable energy supply and for growing the local economies.

This seminar examines issues using policy, legal, and commercial lenses to provide a strategic level understanding of the sustainable value chain.  Participants will receive a detailed review of the legal and commercial issues that must be resolved for successful sector development.  Material is delivered through a variety of methods including: reference reading, in-class lecture, industry panels, and interactive group simulations and workshops.

 

Course Outline

 

FUNDAMENTALS

  • Global energy sector overview, value chain, issues and trends
  • Objectives of a host government, SOEs, energy companies and other stakeholders
  • Host country’s strategic policy issues, legal and regulatory framework and fiscal regime
  • Climate change: adaptation and mitigation targets and implementation
  • Negotiation framework, strategy, and toolsNegotiation framework, strategy, and tools

 

OIL AND GAS (UPSTREAM, MIDSTREAM AND DOWNSTREAM)

  • Upstream fiscal systems, taxation 
  • Upstream contracts and key terms
  • Special considerations for natural gas
  • Sales, storage, and transportation
  • Transboundary pipelines
  • Refineries
  • State participation in oil and gas projects

 

RENEWABLES

  • Commercial and operational framework
  • Development, structuring and financing of renewable projects
  • Case studies for solar, wind, geothermal, hydro, and other projects
  • Requirements for host governments in development their renewables sector

 

POWER SECTOR

  • Sector fundamentals and structure
  • Project funding issues and alternatives
  • Power sector contracts and terms
  • Trends and developments with case studies

 

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Climate change: adaptation and mitigation targets and implementation
  • Local content and other energy sector benefits to local communities
  • Energy corridors and regional cooperation
  • Transparency, anti-corruption, CSR and environmental standards
  • Resolution of energy sector disputes between states and investors


 

Course Advisor

Guly Sabahi is an independent legal adviser and outside general counsel, with 15 years of law firm experience (most recently as Partner at Dentons), advising major international companies and state-owned entities (including NOCs) on cross-border M&A and JV transactions, mainly in the energy sector. Guly also provides legal support on upstream projects, and power projects. Guly has worked on transactions and projects involving assets in over 50 countries in the Middle East, the Sub-Saharan Africa, Central Asia, and Latin America. Guly teaches at Georgetown University Law Center, and regularly speaks at events hosted by the Association of International Petroleum Negotiators (AIPN), and other leading organizations. Guly serves on the Board of Directors, and as VP External Affairs, of the AIPN. Guly is trained in both civil law and common law jurisdictions, and is admitted to practice in the US (New York and District of Columbia), and as Solicitor in England and Wales.

Robert Lesnick is an Executive Advisor to businesses and governments seeking to develop projects which expand development and use of natural gas.  Mr. Lesnick recently retired from the World Bank as its Oil and Gas Program Coordinator after a successful 30-year career in the private sector.  He has extensive experience in the petroleum sector, including commodity trading, project development, and natural gas field operations.  Robert has over 25 years of international experience as a manager and lead negotiator for the development of energy infrastructure projects.  He has conducted business in more than 60 countries on 6 continents.

DATES: OCT 22-26, 2018
   
       
TUITION: $1995    
       

 

Overview

This seminar focuses on the practical skills necessary for drafting contracts in English. Participants will sharpen their skills in working with legal English, and specifically drafting contracts in legal English. The emphasis is on learning by doing, and the seminar will offer the opportunity to draft and receive feedback from experts. Participants will engage in several drafting exercises and a negotiation session.

Course Outline

  

Overview of the U.S. Contract Law

  • Sources of Law
  • Contract Formation
  • Contract Interpretation

 

Basic Drafting Topics

  • Definitions
  • Warranties
  • Termination Clauses
  • Remedy Provisions
  • Contingency Clauses

 

Boilerplate Language and Utilizing Templates

  • Choice of Law/Governing Law
  • Jurisdiction
  • Arbitration
  • Force Majeure
  • Third Party Rights

 

Course Advisor

Dr. Kevin Fandl is the director of the Global Legal Education Institute and author several books, including Narrowing the Gap: Legal English for the New Global Legal Practitioner and Lost in Translation: Effective Legal Writing for the International Legal Community. He has taught law and policy courses around the world since 2004 and specializes in the areas of international trade, migration, and economic development. Dr. Fandl is a graduate of American University (J.D., M.A.) and George Mason University (Ph.D.) and is currently Professor of Legal Studies and Global Business Strategy at the Fox School of Business at Temple University.

 

 

DATES: OCT 8-19, 2018    
       
TUITION: $4450    
       

 

 

 

 

Overview

This course highlights the major issues and procedures relating to the development and regulation of capital and securities markets in developing economies. Participants will discuss the major building blocks of an effective capital market and the policy environment needed to help its development. The course also includes issues related to the growing interaction of emerging markets with developed capital markets.

 

Course Outline

Legal, Regulatory and Institutional Framework

  • Institutional structure related to market's needs
  • Government regulation: securities laws, securities exchange commissions, central banks, ministries of finance
  • Stock exchanges: rules and regulations, self or external regulation, membership and listing standards
  • Corporate governance
  • Transparency
  • Prospectuses

 

Development of Capital Markets

  • Policy issues affecting development of capital markets
  • Managing risks and responding to crises in Capital Markets
  • Capital markets and housing finance

 

Role of Participants in Capital Markets

  • Regulators, financial institutions, accountants/auditors, government
  • Issuers of securities in capital markets
  • Investors in capital markets: individuals and institutional players
  • Professionals: brokers, dealers, underwriters
  • Financial intermediaries: commercial banks, merchant banks, mutual funds, hedge funds, insurance companies, pension funds
  • Initial public offerings (IPOs)

 

Typical Field Trips (selection based on availability)

  • New York Stock Exchange; Nasdaq; U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, U.S. Federal Reserve Bank in New York; a ratings agency, such as Standard and Poors; The Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation

 

Course Advisor

Paul Freedman is Counsel at the AES Corporation, a global energy company. Mr. Freedman was previously Chief Counsel for Credit Programs at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and has substantial government and private sector experience in capital markets transactions in developed countries and emerging markets. He has worked on the first non-sovereign bond offerings in several developing countries, and he has played a leading role in the structuring and negotiation of USAID's partial credit guarantees for bond offerings and bank loans in over 40 developing countries.

 

 

DATES: OCT 8-19, 2018
   
       
TUITION: $3950    
       

 

 

 

 

Overview

This course offers an intensive experience in drafting legislation. The course assists participants in mastering legislative provisions that pose special challenges to legislative drafters. Participants will draft all language necessary to develop and amend a simple bill as it would move through the legislative process and will also organize and draft a long, complex bill involving the reorganization of government bodies. Some prior experience in legislative drafting or legislation is helpful.

Course Outline

  

Drafting a Simple Bill

  • Learning to convert a legislative proposal into a bill for introduction in a legislative chamber

 

Drafting Amendments to a Bill and to Law

  • Committee "markup" amendments
  • "Floor" (whole House) amendments
  • Amendments to existing law

 

Instruction on Specialized Legislative Processes

  • Working with legislative committees
  • Budget and appropriations rules and problems
  • Participating in a mock committee markup session

 

Drafting a Government Grant Program

  • Instruction in selection and drafting of legislative language authorizing grants

 

Drafting Government Reorganization

  • Establishing a Government Agency
  • Abolishing a Government Agency
  • Consolidating Government Agencies
  • Savings ("grandfather") clauses
  • Transition provisions
  • Repeals

 

Drafting a Complex Bill

  • Organization of Legislative Provisions
  • Close Supervision and Review of Drafting Work

 

Course Advisor

Arthur J. Rynearson served as the Deputy Legislative Counsel of the United States Senate from 1999 to 2003. For more than 26 years, he was an attorney-drafter in the Office of the Legislative Counsel, United States Senate, where he drafted thousands of bills, resolutions, and amendments. He has 20 years experience teaching legislative drafting and legislation to foreign parliamentarians, attorneys, and law students. He also served as a legislative researcher for the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress. He is a graduate of the Cornell University Law School, where he specialized in international legal affairs, and a Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Hamilton College, where he majored in Government. Mr. Rynearson is also the author of Legislative Drafting Step-by-Step (Carolina Academic Press-ILI, 2013), a user-friendly guide to drafting legislation.

 

DATES: OCT 8-12, 2018    
       
TUITION: $2500    
       

 

 

 

Overview

This course highlights the foundational issues in respect to the development and regulation of capital and securities markets, and comprises the first week of the Capital Markets: Development and Regulation seminar. The Foundations seminar also includes the field trip to New York where typical capital markets institutions are visited.

Participants will be exposed to selected topics based on the Course Outline listed under the “Capital Markets: Development and Regulation” seminar, depending on the final schedule, but topics could include:

 

Course Outline

Legal, Regulatory and Institutional Framework

  • Institutional structure related to market's needs
  • Government regulation: securities laws, securities exchange commissions, central banks, ministries of finance
  • Stock exchanges: rules and regulations, self or external regulation, membership and listing standards
  • Corporate governance
  • Transparency
  • Prospectuses

 

Development of Capital Markets

  • Policy issues affecting development of capital markets
  • Managing risks and responding to crises in Capital Markets
  • Capital markets and housing finance

 

Role of Participants in Capital Markets

  • Regulators, financial institutions, accountants/auditors, government
  • Issuers of securities in capital markets
  • Investors in capital markets: individuals and institutional players
  • Professionals: brokers, dealers, underwriters
  • Financial intermediaries: commercial banks, merchant banks, mutual funds, hedge funds, insurance companies, pension funds
  • Initial public offerings (IPOs)

 

Typical Field Trips (selection based on availability)

  • New York Stock Exchange; Nasdaq; U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, U.S. Federal Reserve Bank in New York; a ratings agency, such as Standard and Poors; The Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation

 

Course Advisor

Mr. Paul Freedman is Counsel at the AES Corporation, a global energy company. Mr. Freedman was previously Chief Counsel for Credit Programs at the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and has substantial government and private sector experience in capital markets transactions in developed countries and emerging markets. He worked on the first non-sovereign bond offerings in several developing countries, and he played a leading role in the structuring and negotiation of USAID’s partial credit guarantees for bond offerings and bank loans in over 40 developing countries.