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World Arbitration Update 



International Dispute Resolution and the Ukraine-Russia Crisis 



DESCRIPTION:

The International Law Institute is pleased to be able to support the World Arbitration Update (“WAU”) in thier upcoming webinar "International Dispute Resolution and the Ukraine-Russia Crisis", we encourage your participation in this important program. 

The World Arbitration Update invites you to attend a 75-minute webinar discussion by leading practitioners in the international dispute resolution field on the recent developments concerning the intersection of dispute resolution and the Ukraine-Russia crisis. According to the Kyiv School of Economics, Ukraine has so far experienced economic damage amounting up to $600 billion. Over $10 billion in airplane assets have been reportedly stranded in Russia setting off potentially large insurance claims and related disputes. Yale School of Management has collected data showing that almost 1,000 companies have publicly announced they are voluntarily curtailing operations in Russia to some degree beyond the bare minimum legally required by international sanctions. The Russian parliament continues to consider the expropriation of foreign assets. International disputes involving Russia and Ukraine are arising from the crisis and more likely to follow. Our speakers will discuss related topics, including: the impact of sanctions, the proposed formation of an international claims commission for Ukraine, the impact of the crisis on the legal profession, the potential and current international forums in which Ukrainian businesses and investors could submit legal recourse to address the consequences of the war in Ukraine, as well as an update on the ICJ case, Ukraine v. Russian Federation. 



TIME:     4:15 PM – 5:30 PM GMT

DATE:     July 12, 2022




VENUE:

     Lecture Theatre
     School of International Arbitration
     Centre for Commercial Law Studies
     Queen Mary University of London,
     67-69 Lincoln's Inn Fields,
     London WC2A 3JB 


MODERATORS:

     Ian A. Laird – Crowell & Moring LLP
     Dr. Jose Antonio Rivas – Xtrategy LLP.


INTRODUCTORY REMARKS


     Prof. Loukas Mistelis


SPEAKERS:

     Gene Burd, Partner – FisherBroyles, LLP
     Prof. Chiara Giorgetti – University of Richmond, School of Law 
     Mark Meyer, Partner – Crowell & Moring LLP
     Olena Perepelynska, Partner, Head of International Arbitration, INTEGRITES
     Simon Fawell – Signature Litigation LLP 


REGISTRATION:

     IN-PERSON Attendance:
     https://lnkd.in/gYfZbztb

     VIRTUAL Attendance:        https://lnkd.in/gE3AdRKK



ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:  Available at  www.worldarbitrationupdate.com 

 

 Marek Dubovec
Marek Dubovec 




The International Law Institute proudly welcomes Marek Dubovec as ILI’s Director of Law Reform Programs.  We are excited to include Marek’s leadership capabilities, internationally recognized expertise in secured transactions, and his trusted relationships with governments and international organizations to ILI's global capabilities.

For over 15 years, Marek has been working with international standard-setters, including UNCITRAL and UNIDROIT to draft conventions, model laws, principles and guides that assist States in modernizing their commercial law frameworks. He has worked on the implementation of these standards under the projects funded by the World Bank Group, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, FSD-Kenya, and others. He has assisted countries in Africa (e.g., Kenya), Asia (e.g., the Philippines), Eastern Europe (e.g., the Ukraine), the Middle East (e.g., the UAE) and Latin America (e.g. Colombia) with reforms of their secured transactions, factoring, warehouse receipts and related legislation. In these projects, Marek drafted laws and regulations, assisted with the building of registration systems, and provided capacity building to various stakeholders, including financial institutions, government officials, and judges.

Additionally, Marek is Professor of Practice at the University of Arizona, James E. Rogers College of Law and has served as a visiting scholar at the Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies of the Bank of Japan, and a visiting professor at the University of Puerto Rico School of Law.

Marek has served as delegate to the UNCITRAL Working  Groups I [MSMEs]; Working Group VI [Security Interests]; and Working Group V [Insolvency].  At UNIDROIT, Marek serves as Advisor to the Secretariat on Model Law on Warehouse Receipt and is a member of Working Groups and Drafting Committees for the projects on Model Law on Factoring and Digital Assets and Private Law. Marek has served as a delegate to the Organization of American States.

Marek has received the "The Commercial Finance Association Special Recognition Award of Leadership in the Development and Adoption of Modern and Effective Secured Transactions Laws" (2016); and the The Munger Prize for Scholars in International and Business Law, James E. Rogers College of Law (2004).  Marek is an Elected Member of the American Law Institute (ALI) and ALI Member of the Uniform Commercial Code and Emerging Technologies Committee.  Marek has also served as conference co-chair on: "Third Conference on International Coordination of Secured Transactions Law Reforms: Advancing Reforms Globally and in Latin America Through Enhanced Coordination", Los Andes University (Cartagena, Colombia), 2020; "Second Conference on Coordinating Secured Transactions Law Reforms: Advancing Global Reforms and Building a Uniform System", Universidad Carlos III de Madrid  (Spain) 2018; and "Secured Transactions Coordination Conference: Advancing Global Reforms", University of Pennsylvania Law School 2017.

Marek has produced several policy papers, reports and other publications for international organizations, including Secured Transactions, Collateral Registries, and Movable Asset-Based Financing Knowledge Guide and Guidance Notes on Distributed Ledger Technology and Secured Transactions for the World Bank Group. These publications have guided local policymakers and legislators in understanding the benefits of modern secured transactions frameworks as well as the challenges posed by modern technologies. He also developed the substantive content, in collaboration with a group of experts, for the Guide on Best Practice for Electronic Collateral Registries setting out the standards for the establishment and operation of electronic collateral registries. Some of his law reform work has been published, including in a co-authored book "Secured Transactions Law Reform in Africa".


On April 12 the International Law Institute hosted a conference and discussion on the release of Ambassador John Maresca's [Ret.] new book "The Unknown Peace Agreement: How the Helsinki–Geneva–Vienna–Paris Negotiations of the CSCE Produced the Final Peace Agreement to formally concluded World War Two in Europe".

The agreements setting the foundations of relations between Post Soviet Russia and the Western nations, is as critical and sensitive today, as it was 30 years ago.

The agreement, formally known as the Joint Declaration of Twenty Two States, signed by their heads of state or government, including George H W Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev on November 19, 1990 in Paris, this "peace treaty" ended World War II. The chief US negotiator of this agreement and many others, Ambassador Maresca has had a most distinguished career, twice Chef du Cabinet to NATO Secretaries General, and rector of the UN University for Peace, possibly most noteworthy was his appointment in early 1991 by Secretary James Baker as special envoy to open US relations with the newly independent states of the former USSR. He was the first American official to visit these countries, including Ukraine. His assistant throughout this mission was Marie Yovanovich, later US ambassador to Ukraine.

Ambassador presented his book and the "Baker mission". He was introduced by his former colleague Avis Bohlen, former assistant secretary of state and American ambassador to Bulgaria, and daughter of Charles Bohlen, who was once Jack Maresca's boss in the Department.



 

 

 




THE PUBLICATION:


TITLE:                THE UNKNOWN PEACE AGREEMENT

                          How the Helsinki–Geneva–Vienna–Paris Negotiations of the CSCE Produced the Final Peace Agreement
                          and Concluded World War Two in Europe


AUTHOR:            John J. Maresca


PURCHASE:      https://cup.columbia.edu/book/the-unknown-peace-agreement/9783838216324


John Maresca The Unknown Peace 

DESCRIPTION:

The “Joint Declaration of Twenty-two States,” signed in Paris on November 19, 1990 by the Chiefs of State or Government of all the countries which participated in World War Two in Europe, is the closest document we will ever have to a true “peace treaty” concluding World War II in Europe. In his new book, retired United States Ambassador John Maresca, who led the American participation in the negotiations, explains how this document was quietly negotiated following the reunification of Germany and in view of Soviet interest at that time in normalizing their relations with Europe. With the reunification of Germany which had just taken place it was, for the first time since the end of the war, possible to have a formal agreement that the war was over, and the countries concerned were already negotiating in Vienna in preparation for a summit-level signing ceremony in Paris. With Gorbachev interested in more positive relations with Europe, and with the formal reunification of Germany which had just taken place, such an agreement was — for the first time — possible. All the leaders coming to the Paris summit had an interest in producing a document which would formally conclude the War — a “peace agreement” -- and which would be signed at the summit level by the Chiefs of State or Government of the states which were participants in the war. This gave impetus for the negotiators in Vienna to draft such a document, intended to normalize relations among them. The "Joint Declaration" was negotiated carefully, and privately, among the Ambassadors representing the countries which had participated, in one way or another, in World War Two in Europe. And the resulting document—the “Joint Declaration” — was signed at the summit level, at the Elysée Palace in Paris, on November 19, 1990. But this “Joint Declaration" was overshadowed at the time by the "Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe" — signed at the same signing ceremony — and has remained un-noticed since then.


AUTHOR:

The “Joint Declaration of Twenty-two States,” signed in Paris on November 19, 1990 by the Chiefs of State or Government of all the countries which participated in World War Two in Europe, is the closest document we will ever have to a true “peace treaty” concluding World War II in Europe. In his new book, retired United States Ambassador John Maresca, who led the American participation in the negotiations, explains how this document was quietly negotiated following the reunification of Germany and in view of Soviet interest in normalizing their relations with Europe. With the reunification of Germany which had just taken place it was, for the first time since the end of the war, possible to have a formal agreement that the war was over, and the countries concerned were all gathering for a summit-level signing ceremony in Paris. With Gorbachev interested in more positive relations with Europe, and with the formal reunification of Germany, such an agreement was — for the first time — possible, because for the first time since the War it was possible to negotiate and agree with Germany as the single, sovereign state which had conducted the war. All the leaders coming to the Paris summit had an interest in a formal conclusion to the War, and this gave impetus for the negotiators in Vienna to draft a document intended to normalize relations among them. The Joint Declaration was negotiated carefully, and privately, among the Ambassadors representing the countries which had participated, in one way or another, in World War Two in Europe. The resulting document — the “Joint Declaration” — was signed, at the summit level, at the Elysée Palace in Paris. But there was no public announcement of the Joint Declaration and its significance, and it was overshadowed by the "Treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe" — signed at the same signature event — and has remained un-noticed since then.

No one could possibly have foreseen that the USSR would be dissolved about one year later, making it impossible to negotiate a more formal treaty to close World War II in Europe. The “Joint Declaration” thus remains the closest document the world will ever see to a formal “Peace Treaty” concluding World War Two in Europe. It was signed by all the Chiefs of State or Government of all the countries which participated in World War II in Europe.

Ambassador John J. (“Jack”) Maresca spent a career as an American diplomat and negotiator, after six years as a US Naval Officer. He was the “Chef de Cabinet” for two NATO Secretaries General, and was involved in the CSCE negotiations from the time when NATO was preparing for them in Brussels. He went to Helsinki for the opening round of the CSCE, pursued the negotiations through the first CSCE conference, which was concluded at the summit level in Helsinki, and became the Deputy Head of the United States Delegation. He was then in charge of the State Department office which tracked the follow-up to the Conference and was later named as the Ambassador and Chief of the American delegation when the Conference was reconvened in Vienna to prepare for the second CSCE summit in Paris. He was then designated as a special Ambassadorial envoy to open US relations with the newly independent states, after the dissolution of the former USSR, and was the first official American visitor to these countries after their independence.

 

The International Law Institute presented on Navigating Modern Disputes and Examining Ukraine at the University of California Davis School of Law Journal of International Law and Policy Symposium on Friday March 11 from 11:00am - 12:00pm (California Pacific Standard Time). The ILI panel featured Judge Monica Mugenyi, Judge of the Uganda Court of Appeals and former Principal Judge of the East African Court of Justice discussing resolving regional disputes, and Helene Gogadze from Sheppard Mullin discussed settlement of investment disputes.

Ambassador Andriy Pravednyk, Ukraine Ambassador to Kenya discussed the Ukraine crisis. Volodymyr Shkilevych, Special Legal Consultant at Covington and Burling and former Deputy Head of the Office of International Law for the Ukraine Ministry of Foreign Affairs discussed the ICJ and Ukraine. Volodymyr is on the Covington team presenting Ukraine at the ICJ.

 UC Davis ILI Symposium
 

IMG 0612 light blue 
Foster De Reitzes 




The International Law Institute is sad to announce the recent passing of Foster De Reitzes. Foster served as Secretary of the Board for the International Law Institute; Senior Advisor; and legal advisor for ILI publications. Mr. De Reitzes supported the operational goals of ILI, our international development mission, and our collective goals of building the technical capacity of global leaders and their governments, strengthening international bonds, and expanding the rule of law.

Foster served the ILI for over 20 years. His calm nature, thoughtful advice, and quick smile will be long remembered, greatly appreciated, and very much missed.

Prior to ILI, Foster was a partner with the law firm of Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP. There Foster had over 30 years of private practice experience in corporate, administrative law, and energy. Foster received his BA in Government from Cornell University and law degree from the University of Pennsylvania. He was been admitted to practice in New York and Washington, DC; before the U S Supreme Court; and federal circuit courts of appeal.

In New York, Foster practiced corporate and securities law. In Washington, DC, Foster spent more than 12 years representing Native American tribes and Alaska Native corporations on a wide variety of energy and other matters. Foster then concentrated his practice on commercial transactions and major court and administrative litigation with emphasis on the utility and steel industries. In his support and promotion of new enterprises and technology, Foster also managed angel investment for start-up tech companies for many years.

We will miss Foster.

 

THE INTERNATIONAL LAW INSTITUTE (ILI) HOSTED A WEBINAR ON
“REFORM IN INVESTMENT ARBITRATION: NEW DEVELOPMENTS AT ICSID & UNCITRAL”

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2022, 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM ET

 

 

 

 

International Law Institute hosted a 75-minute panel discussion by leading practitioners in the investment arbitration field on the recent developments in the reform at ICSID and before the UNCITRAL Working Group III (WG III). As announced by ICSID on January 20, ICSID submitted resolutions on the amended ICSID rules to the Administrative Council - ICSID’s governing body - for a vote of approval by March 21 with the new rules coming into effect on July 1, 2022.

UNCITRAL Working Group III is scheduled to meet the week of February 14 to engage in further discussions concerning an arbitrator code of conduct, and the proposed international investment court, among other issues. Our panel of guest speakers will provide an update on the status of these efforts and what they may mean for investor-state dispute resolution in the future. This will be followed by a discussion and a Q&A session with the attendees.

 

MODERATOR:

    • Ian A. Laird, Crowell

OPENING REMARKS:

    • Professor Don Wallace, Chairman, International Law Institute

SPEAKERS:

    • Mallory Silberman, Arnold & Porter
    • Karin Kizer, Attorney Adviser, U.S. Department of State
    • Lauren Mandell, Wilmer Hale 

CONTRIBUTORS:

    • Borzu Sabahi, Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle
    • José Antonio Rivasr, Xtrategy LLP

In 2021 the International Law Institute was honored to have hosted nine distinguished in-person delegations from the Parliament of Kenya through 2021.

The International Law Institute is proud of a long and constructive relationship with the Government of Kenya extending from the 1980s. Over the many years, ILI has worked constructively to support capacity training, and technical conferences training over 600 Kenyan officials.  ILI values our close relationship and trust our programs continue to contribute to our shared goals promoting promote the effective application of good governance and the rule of law.

ILI Director Kim Phan, developed and delivered each of the 2021 programs. These programs were graciously recognized by the Senate of Kenya: Kenya Senate Formally Commends ILI    [click for article and video] 

ILI would like to thank the expert faculty who contributed to these important training: Reb Brownell (former Deputy Chief of Staff to Mitch McConnell) Hon. Tom Davis (former Chairman of the U.S. House Oversight Committee), Rick Messick, Phil Kiko (former Chief Administrative Officer of the U.S. House of Representatives), Thomas Hicks (Vice-Chairman, Election Assistance Commission), Susan Oursler (former Chief Clerk of the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee). Art Rynearson (former Deputy Legislative Counsel, U.S. Senate), and Kenneth Kraft (former staff on U.S. House Appropriations Committee).

 kenya 2021 1
 Kenyan Senate Committee on Justice, Legal Affairs and Human Rights
May 31 – June 3, 2021 



This distinguished 10 member delegation including the Chairpersons of eight Senate Committees  Guided by teh Justice Committee, conferences focused on a comparative understanding of the U.S. Senate, Legislative Oversight, Administrative Operations of a Legislature, and Elections and Election Disputes, and a site visit to the Maryland House in Annapolis adding to the experiential understanding.  




 kenya 2021 2
Leadership of the Senate of Kenya
Executive Leadership 
 June 7 – 9, 2021



The Honorable Speaker of the Senate of Kenya led an eminent 13 member delegation which included the Senate Deputy Speaker, Senate Majority Leader, Senate Minority Leader, Senate Majority Whip, and Senate Minority Whip. By request the Speaker, point of discussion included Legislative Leadership, Managing the Personalities of a Legislature to get Performance, Working with Senate Leadership, Legislative Oversight of the Executive, and Performance and Functions for Senate Leadership Staff. 




 kenya 2021 3a
Senate Board of Management – Group I
Executive Leadership 
August 9 – 12, 2021 



The Clerk of the Senate of Kenya led an esteemed delegation of 10 members which included the Deputy Clerk, the Director of Legal Services, and the Director of Committee Services, Director of the Parliamentary Service Commission Secretariat, the Director of Legislative and Procedural Services, and the Director of the Senate Legislative Office. The core of our sessions focused on principles of Senate Board of Management, Executive Legislative Leadership, comparative U.S. Senate, Management, Administration, and Service Delivery of a Congress, and Leadership and Decision Making. 




 kenya 2021 4
 Senate Board of Management– Group II
Executive Leadership
August 16 – 19, 2021 



This 10 member delegation led by the Clerk of the Senate included the Deputy Clerk, the Director of the Speaker’s Office, the Hansard Editor, the Director of Finance and Accounting Services, the Sergeant-At-Arms, and the Chief Procurement Officer. Program conferences concentrated on Executive Legislative Leadership and included discussion of the U.S. Senate, Management, Administration, and Service Delivery of a Congress, and Leadership and Decision Making.




kenya 2021 5 
Senate Liaison Committee – Group I
Leadership and Committee Functions 
 August 30 – September 2, 2021



Led by the Chairpersons of the Senate Committees on: Agriculture, Education, Finance and Budget, Labour, Environment and Natural Resources, National Cohesion, and the Vice Chairperson of the Committee on National Security. As the Liaison Committee features Chairpersons of all standing Senate Committees, this program consisted of leadership and committee functions training including Senate Leadership, the Structure and Function of a Senate Committee, and Legislative Oversight. 




kenya 2021 6 
 Senate Liaison Committee – Group II
Leadership and Committee Functions
October 25 – 28, 2021 



This 12  member delegation was led by the Honorable Speaker of the Senate included the Chairpersons of the Senate Committees on: Devolution, Energy, Justice, Health, Trade, and Roads.  Program concentrated on Leadership and Committee Functions, Legislative – Executive Relations and included a high-level panel discussion on the U.S. – Kenya Free Trade Agreement. Speakers on the Panel included the Deputy Head of Mission at the Embassy of Kenya and the President of the Corporate Council on Africa.





 kenya 2021 7
National Assembly Justice and Legal Affairs Committee 
 November 2 – 4, 2021



Led by the Chairperson of the Justice Committee and included eight Members of the Committee along with the Chairperson of the National Assembly Committee on Implementation, this training focused on the work of the Committee including comparative conferences on the structure of the U.S. Congress, Legislative Oversight of the Executive, as well as Roles and Functions of the U.S. House Judiciary Committee.




 kenya 2021 8
 National Assembly of Kenya
Training on Devolution, Legislation and Oversight
November 8 – 12. 2021



This distinguished 9 member delegation consisted of the Chairperson of the National Assembly Committee on Budget and Appropriations and included the Chairperson of the National Assembly Committee on Finance, the Director of the Parliamentary Budget Office, the Director of Finance and Accounting Services, the Director of Legislative and Procedural Services, the Deputy Director of Litigation, the Director of Committee Services, and the Legal Counsel for the National Assembly. This program  focused on financial aspects of the devolution process of Kenya. Topics included an Overview of Congress, Legislative Drafting, the Appropriations Process, and an overview of the US Congressional Budget Office.  




kenya 2021 9 
Deputy Leadership of the Kenya Senate
Executive Leadership and Legislative  
December 7-10, 2021 



Led by Senator Margaret Kamar, the Deputy Speaker of the Senate, the 7 member delegation included the Deputy Majority Leader, the Deputy Minority Leader, Deputy Majority Whip, and the Speaker’s Panel.  This program focused on Executive Leadership and Legislative Training for the Deputy Leadership of the Kenya Senate.

 

The Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies, the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies, and the International Law Institute present a forum and accompanying report on “Covid-19 and the Role of Technology”.

Further contributions and support were generously provided by the International Center for Terrorism Studies, the University of Maryland,  Instito de Fusion Nuclear Fusion (IFN) “Guillermo Velarde” of the Polytechnical University of Madrid (UPM), Cyber Security and Privacy Research Institute (CSPRI) a George Washington University institute chartered within the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and the International Law Institute.

This forum focuses specifically on “COVID-19 and the Role of Technology” (December 2021) and its experienced lessons anticipating future health and security related challenges nationally and globally. This timely Forum reviews selected successful and new technologies, such as bio-detection, respiratory epidemiology, vaccinations, artificial intelligence, cyber defense, as well as other relevant topics.

Contributions and insights were provided by an invited interdisciplinary panel of academics and practitioners who participated at a special virtual Forum held on June 29, 2021 and administered at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies. The program of this event began with opening remarks by Dr. Jennifer Buss (CEO, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies). The virtual Forum was moderated by Professor Yonah Alexander (Director of the International Center for Terrorism Studies and Senior Fellow at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies). Presentations and discussion were offered by Distinguished Professor Rita Colwell (University of Maryland, College Park; Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health); Dr. Daniel Gerstein (Former Acting Undersecretary and Deputy Undersecretary for the Department of Homeland Security); Dr. Donald Milton (Professor of Environmental Health at the University of Maryland School of Public Health, with a secondary appointment in the Department of Medicine, School of Medicine); Dr. Costis Toregas (Director, Cyber Security and Privacy Research Institute at The George Washington University); Dr. Neil Wasserman (Department of Computer Science The George Washington University); Dr. Eric L. Moore (Director, U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command Chemical Biological Center (DEVCOM CBC)); Dr. Natividad Carpintero-Santamaria (Professor at the Polytechnic University of Madrid (UPM) and General Secretary of the Instito de Fusion Nuclear “Guillermo Velarde”); and Amb. (Ret.) Charles Ray (Former US Ambassador to Cambodia and Zimbabwe). Closing remarks were delivered by Professor Yonah Alexander.

This forum was conducted at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies.


 
IUCTS Covid Role Technology cover



SPECIAL FORUM: COVID-19 AND THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY

DOWNLOAD REPORT HERE

 

Forum Video:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Sheila Khama            Stuart Kerr 
Sheila Khama
  Director - SK Resources Consulting [Pty] Ltd.
  Stuart Kerr
President - International Law Institute 

 

Shiela Khama, Director of SK Resources Consulting and Stuart Kerr, ILI President joined together on Sheila Khama Extractives Podcast to discuss the "Ecosystem of Negotiations By State and Investors".

The discussion focused on considerations and strategies in planning and carrying out effective negotiations, both domestic and international, to establish both a strong position, but one which optimistically leads to a mutually beneficial outcome for all parties.



You may listen to the podcast here:

Sheila Khama Podcast 
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN TO THE PODCAST 




Ms. Khama is Director of SK Resources Consulting [Pty] Ltd., a Botswana-based natural resources consulting firm.  Prior to SK Consulting, Ms. Khama served as CEO of DeBeers Botswana; and directed the mining units of the African Development Bank and World Bank.

SK Consulting, offers services in mineral, oil and gas policy, governance and sustainability strategies to private and public sector clients.  Other support services include land tenure, PPPs and SMEs development initiatives. Ms. Khama advised boards of extractive companies doing business in and outside Africa. Ms. Khama is an authority on Africa’s geo-politics and the development environment and conduct business at the highest levels of government and industry.

Ms. Khama serves on advisory boards and technical committees of international NGOs, UN agencies, and academic institutions concerned with human development, sustainable exploitation of natural resources and a low-carbon future, notably the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network on Extractives and Land Resources, the United Nations Office of Operations, the Columbia University Sustainable Investments Centre and the former Oxford University Natural Resources Charter.

Ms. Khama has written thought pieces, documented policy tools and coordinated research and cases studies carried out by experts to support fact-based policy reforms in renewable and non-renewable resources.


You may learn about Sheila Khama, SK Consulting, and access Ms. Khama's weekly podcasts through the following: 


     Sheila Khama Extractives Podcast:     https://www.sheilakhama.com/podcast/     *     

     Sheila Khama Weekly Podcasts:         https://www.sheilakhama.com/content-policies/     *
     SK Consulting Website:                       https://www.sheilakhama.com/
     Sheila Khama Twitter:                          https://twitter.com/SheilaKhama

     * Podcasts are also available on Spotify, iTunes, Amazon music and Google


 

 

The Inter-University of Terrorism Studies presents:

POST 9/11: TWENTY YEARS OF MULTILATERAL COUNTER-TERRORISM COOPERATION

another in a series of special forums on terrorism, Covid-19, national policies, and international cooperation.


The resort of force and violence by state and non-state actors in the struggle for power within and among nations is as old 
as history itself. Both the strong and the weak have deployed modus operandi capabilities ranging from primitive to modern technologies with profound consequences to the security concerns to the global system.

It is not surprising therefore that two decades after 9/11, terrorism from above and below still continues to cast a worrisome arc of instability and political conflicts over many countries and regions of the world. The debate in democracies over the need to craft effective responses to domestic and international terrorism focuses inter alia on realpolitik coupled with moral and human rights considerations.

For instance, since 9/11 expanded state power in the Unites States, these have included policies such as “Global War on Terror”, “Overseas Contingency Operations”, and other strategic and tactical approaches authorizing the use of military force internally and externally. Additionally, the European Union developed key road maps and tool kits for combating terrorism and securing the national interests of member-states (e.g., prevent, pursue, prosecute, punish, persuade, and protect).

Most recently, the United Nations that began its annual General Assembly session in September 2021, has placed discussion items on its agenda regarding combating and eliminating terrorism as well as maintaining international peace and security.

Mindful of the past and current security concerns, effective multilateral counter-terrorism cooperation requires increased international alliances of like-minded nations through diplomacy and other measures in responding successfully to potential conventional and non-conventional terrorist threats in the remainder of the 21st Century.

In this context, the Inter-University Center for Terrorism Studies (IUCTS), the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies (PIPS), the International Law Institute (ILI), and other academic partners organized the virtual academic Forum on “Post 9/11: Twenty Years of Multilateral Counter-Terrorism Cooperation” held on September 09, 2021.

The program of this event began with opening remarks by Professor Don Wallace, Jr. (Chairman of the International Law Institute) and Dr. Jennifer Buss (CEO, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies). The virtual Forum was moderated by Professor Yonah Alexander (Director of the International Center for Terrorism Studies). Presentations and discussion were by Dr. Raffi Gregorian (Deputy to the Under-Secretary-General & Director, United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism), Gen. (Ret.) Wesley Clark (Former NATO Supreme Allied Commander), Amb. (Ret.) Stuart Eizenstat (Former Senior Official with Three US Administrations and Ambassador to the European Union), Hon. Richard Prosen (Deputy Director, Office of Multilateral Affairs, Bureau of Counter-terrorism, U.S. Department of State), and Distinguished University Professor Rita Colwell (University of Maryland, College Park; Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health). Closing remarks were delivered by Gen. (Ret.) Alfred Gray (29th Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps (1987-1991) and Chairman of the Board of Directors and Regents, Potomac Institute for Policy Studies).

This event is the latest Forum on inter-disciplinary health and security threats mounted within the academic framework of 2021 programs.



THE FULL REPORT MAY BE DOWNLOADED HERE